Il Convegno SISP 2016. Qualche suggerimento

Come già segnalato in precedenti post (qui e qui), tra pochi giorni inizierà il Convegno annuale della SISP (Società Italiana di Scienza Politica). Panel, incontri, seminari e tavole rotonde saranno ospitati quest’anno dall’Università degli Studi di Milano, dal 15 al 17 Settembre.

Qui tutte le informazioni su convegno

Qui il programma

Il primo suggerimento per coloro che si recheranno a Milano riguarda questa interessante Tavola Rotonda (che si svolgerà Venerdì in Aula Magna a Scienze Politiche) sulla politica estera italiana:

“Come ripensare la politica estera dell’Italia?”

Chair: Alessandro Colombo, Università degli Studi di Milano

Interventi di:

Min. Paolo Gentiloni
Ambasciatore Sergio Romano
Vittorio Emanuele Parsi, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – Milano

Angelo Panebianco, Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna

 

Come di consueto, segnaliamo anche i panel nei quali Venus in Arms darà presente:

Panel 8.2 Collective violence in intra-state conflicts. From historical cases to ISIS
After the end of the Cold War, intra-state conflicts attracted increasing attention both from policy-makers and scholars, due to their overall numbers, lethality, and for their consequences on regional, and sometimes global, orders. The growing literature on civil wars, and more broadly on collective violence (including terrorism and large-scale violence perpetrated by “criminal” groups such as drug trafficking organizations), provided in the last two decades important insights on the causes, the dynamics – and increasingly in recent years – on the social, economic and political consequences of conflicts. This panel will focus on violence in intra-state conflicts (as well as “transnational civil wars”). In order to do so, it welcomes both theoretical and empirical contributions, ideally gathering proposals that adopt diverse research strategies and research methods, and look at different levels of analysis. The topics include, although they are not limited to, the following:
a) studies on the relation between the evolution of the international system and the proliferation of domestic conflict;
b) papers on the “micro”-level dynamics of violence, such as the strategic use of violence (selective and discriminate) by armed groups;
c) research on spatial and temporal variation of political conflict and violence;
d) studies on the organizational set-up of insurgent organizations, terrorist groups, armed militias;
e) papers on “wartime political orders” and “rebel governance”;
f) insurgent groups’ decision to use terrorist tactics both in civil wars and abroad.

Chairs: Stefano Costalli, Francesco Moro

Terrorists going Transnational: Rethinking the Role of States
Silvia D’Amato

Modelli di analisi per le attuali situazioni di crisi nell’area mediterranea. Incidenza dell’ISIS nelle dinamiche della stabilizzazione.
Fabio Atzeni

The radicalisation pathways and mobilisation dynamics of jihadist foreign fighters: The case of Italy
Francesco Marone

Wearing a Keffiyeh in Rome: The Transnational Relationships Between the Italian Revolutionary Left and the Palestinian Resistance
Luca Falciola

Panel 6.2 Social Movements and Practices of Resistance in Times of Crisis (II)
In the current socio-economic crisis, social movements face several types of challenge: firstly, they are confronting institutions which are less able to mediate new demands for social justice and equity from various sectors of society caused by the successful neo-liberal attack on the welfare system; secondly, given the highly individualized structure of contemporary society, they also experiencing difficulties in building strong and lasting bonds of solidarity and cooperation among people.
It is in this context, on the one side, we see the rise and consolidation of new mutualistic and cooperative experiences of resistance within which new ties for collective action are created, promoting community-led initiatives for social and economic sustainability: solidarity-based exchanges and networks, barter groups, new consumer-producer cooperatives, time banks, local savings groups, ethical banks, alternative social currency, citizens’ self-help groups, solidarity purchasing groups, fair trade, recovered factories, and others similar practices.
On the other side, beyond anti-austerity protests, urban and territorial movements are emerged, generating alternative discourses, new practices and types of relationships; claiming the “right to the city”, they oppose the continuous commodification of the urban areas, the devastation of the territories and the dismantling of the welfare state system: from the locally unwanted land use movements, to the squatting movements for housing and social centres, from the opposition to gentrification processes to the alternative use of the urban spaces, as that made by current “Nuit Debout” movement in Paris.
We are interested in contributions based on empirical research, which investigate on networks, framing, collective identities, forms of action and relations with political institutions and other movements. Comparative studies will be appreciated, but theoretical considerations and in-depth cases studies are also welcome.

Chairs: Fabio De Nardis, Gianni Piazza

Food Movements for a fair and sustainable agri-food system: the case study of Solidarity Purchase Groups Movement in Italy
Daniela Bernaschi

La contestazione a Expo2015 in ottica intersezionale: dal diritto alla città ai diritti animali.
Niccolo Bertuzzi

Narratives and counter-narratives: security issues and peace movements in Italy.
Fabrizio Coticchia e Andrea Catanzaro

Giovani e partecipazione politica in Italia al tempo della crisi
Elisa Lello

Panel 7.4 Le politiche per la sicurezza. Valori, strategie e strumenti (I)
In recent times security policies have been moulded by sources of extremism and radicalization that have triggered a diffuse sense of alarm and panicking within Europe, across its neighbourhoods and at the international level.
These dynamics have been addressed by states and a number of regional and international institutions and organizations Against this background, European security programs have been developed as a reaction to terrorist threat that have been framed as a transnational phenomenon. The extent to which security policies are shaped by local practices and actors has been overlooked, while security provisions are very often locally grounded.
The aim of this panel is to explore the evolution of homeland security concepts and security policy paradigms, in Europe and beyond, and to ascertain the degree to which their implementation can be detected in various policies and practices.
The philosophy and strategy of security policies seek to depart from the traditional approach of solely reacting to risks, crimes or incidents by calling upon both proactive and reactive measures in an attempt to eradicate – or minimize – the fundamental roots of criminal behaviours. Community policing is that law enforcement agencies will improve their performance and level of service to the community by forging partnerships with those actors identified as “external” to the police organization and by utilizing problem-solving techniques and new technologies in order to proactively combat and prevent crimes.
In many countries security policies are on top of the political agenda of central and local governments also in order to reach a better coordination among global, state and local authorities.
In recent years, a great deal of effort has also been invested in redirecting the role of international, regional and local authorities to protecting life and property from a multitude of internal and external threats and risks by increasing the ‘securitization’ of a number of issues.
This is particularly evident, for example in policies that address problems of urban deterioration or ordinary crime.
The panel seeks to gather contributions devoted to security policies as treated at various governance levels stretching from local to global. Multidisciplinary papers confronting the topic of security from different perspectives are particularly welcome.
Chairs: Serena Viola Giusti, Maria Stella Righettini

Discussants: Serena Viola Giusti

Through military lenses. Security perceptions and learning in the case of Italian armed forces
Fabrizio Coticchia, Francesco Niccolò Moro, e Lorenzo Cicchi

La sicurezza negli stadi. Il nuovo modello organizzativo per la sicurezza dello Stadio Olimpico di Roma
Nicola Ferrigni

The European integration Fund, a trigger for domestic intra and inter institutional changes
Gaia Testore

 

Ci vediamo a Milano

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CALL FOR PAPERS: “Collective violence in intra-state conflicts. From historical cases to ISIS” (SISP 2016)

We invite you to submit paper proposals at the panel organized by (our) Francesco Moro (with Stefano Costalli) at the next SISP Conference, which will be held in Milan (September 15-17 2016). The panel focuses on collective violence in intra-state conflicts.

Here all the info on the Sisp annual convention.

Here more info on the panel, which is within the IR section.

Here below the abstract of the panel:

After the end of the Cold War, intra-state conflicts attracted increasing attention both from policy-makers and scholars, due to their overall numbers, lethality, and for their consequences on regional, and sometimes global, orders. The growing literature on civil wars, and more broadly on collective violence (including terrorism and large-scale violence perpetrated by “criminal” groups such as drug trafficking organizations), provided in the last two decades important insights on the causes, the dynamics – and increasingly in recent years – on the social, economic and political consequences of conflicts. This panel will focus on violence in intra-state conflicts (as well as “transnational civil wars”). In order to do so, it welcomes both theoretical and empirical contributions, ideally gathering proposals that adopt diverse research strategies and research methods, and look at different levels of analysis. The topics include, although they are not limited to, the following:
a) studies on the relation between the evolution of the international system and the proliferation of domestic conflict;
b) papers on the “micro”-level dynamics of violence, such as the strategic use of violence (selective and discriminate) by armed groups;
c) research on spatial and temporal variation of political conflict and violence;
d) studies on the organizational set-up of insurgent organizations, terrorist groups, armed militias;
e) papers on “wartime political orders” and “rebel governance”;
f) insurgent groups’ decision to use terrorist tactics both in civil wars and abroad.


Submission deadline: 5th June 2016.

See you in Milan.

 

 

 

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 87

ISIS might make the headlines more for its sponsoring/conducting terrorist attacks in Europe (and Asia), but The Atlantic’s Adam Chandler reminds of the incredible civilian victimization taking place in Iraq.

While all the attention is focused on the Middle East, let’s not forget how crime represents – in terms of lethality to begin with – a very large threat in Central America. FP features an article on the state of health (good) of the region’s gangs.

Technological advances are difficult to foresee, and the cost of emerging technologies often hard to justify. The costs of the JSF/F-35 might be in part be justified by its early adoption of revolutionary technological solutions, especially related to “cognitive electronic warfare”.

In the meanwhile, Italian second F-35 has been making its debut flight, as reported by RID (in English), and the Cabinet is still evaluating how many more will come.

Finally, the fall of counterinsurgency, now at an advanced stage. Former COIN and Iraq hero David Petraeus might be demoted from 4-star General, DefenseNews reports.

 

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 83

Christmas is coming, but it does not seem like international politics is stopping for the event. War in Syria and Iraq is still raging, with European countries taking a more active role in recent weeks. How do they get the intelligence needed for operating? Seymour M. Hersh writes about US intel sharing in the London Review of Books.

Attacked in its “homeland”, ISIS needs a constant influx of recruits. Could videogames, or Hollywood, provide examples to took at?

But problems for Western Powers are not limited to Iraq and Syria. Talibans are advancing (again) in Afghanistan, and the recent suicide attacks near an American base shows how the situation id far from improving.

In recent years, the debate in security studies has been often focusing on non-traditional military threats such as organized crime. El Salvador’s gang problem is a case in point.

Finally, what are the COIN lessons that the Rebels and Republic in Star Wars should learn from Afghanistan and Iraq?

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 81

Britain last week joined the coalition in Syria, after a favourable parliamentary vote. On Kingsofwar, some thought on the rationale, and wisdom, of British intervention.

In the meanwhile, SecDef Carter announced that the last barriers will be removed to women in the armed forces. A survey shows that the rank-and-file is sceptical about the measure.

Sandy Berger, National Security Advisor to President Clinton, died at the age of 70. These are a few pages of an oral memoir, discussing some of the major foreign policy crises faced in the 90s, from the crisis of the Mexican peso to Kosovo.

This is an Italian blog, and there is news in Italian defence policy this week. The first  F-35 Lightning II has been delivered to the Italian Air Force, assembled in Italy. More are to come, although the number has been cut by more than half since the original planning (more news in Italian, here).

Maps are an important part of how the images of the world. This Burmese map challenges our conventional view of cartography, and the world.

 

 

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 79

From the Turkish border to Paris to the ground in Syria and Iraq. It is still too early to understand the consequences of the Turkish missile intercepting a Russian Su-24 allegedly flying in Turkish skies. But you can follow live the BBC updates. And start imagining what could happen next.

In the two weeks after the Paris attacks, there have been some attempts to dig deeper into its consequences. Rosa Brooks writes that we should learn to accept some uncomfortable truths. Including the recognition that there is probably no chance to achieve complete security from attacks.

Barry Posen argues that defeating ISIS in Syria and Iraq is proving to be a very costly undertaking. And Western escalation might be actually what ISIS wants. Containment of the threat should be a more sustainable long term strategy.

Most analysts would agree, in any case, that better action against the ability of ISIS to extract resources would effectively weaken it. The Atlantic features an article on where ISIS money come from.

Finally, a bit off-topic. What is the role of scholarship in these hard times? Warontherocks contributes to the endless debate on the relationship between academia and defence decision-making.

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – Week 68

While we are looking at the current development of the crisis in Syria, here you’ll find a broad collection of analyses by “The Strategy Bridge” on ISIS/ISIL/IS. A specify attention is devoted to the narratives adopted by the group.

Still on Syria (and drones), “The Guardian” provides news and comments regarding the “kill list” approved by the UK National Security Council. Indeed, unmanned RAF aerial drones armed with Hellfire missiles have been patrolling the skies over Syria for months seeking to target British jihadis.

Carnegie Europe focuses on “NATO and the security vacuum in Europe“. Is the “politics of 2%” realistic? An interesting starting point for a crucial debate.

Duck of Minerva started a controversial discussion over “doing something” for addressing the dramatic refugee crisis and the academia. Here and here tow different perspectives.

Finally, -98 days to The Force Awakens….

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 62

Terrorism came back in Tunisia, France and Kuwait. The Independent provides useful maps that illustrate how far and fast ISIL has spread in the last years.

The debate on China rising is still lively and controversial. The National Interest wonders “How George Kennan Would Contend with China’s Rise“.

Over the past years, India has been one of the largest arms importers. Here you’ll find a detailed analysis of India’s weapons imports and regional balance.

Sanctions have become “the defining feature of the Western response to several geopolitical challenges”. If you are interested in sanctions, we warmly recommend this article by the Council on Foreign Relations.

Finally, the crisis in the Eurozone. There are a lot of  analyses regarding Grexit, referendum, Germany, debt, and euro. We only wish a positive solution for the current situation. In this way

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 61

ISIS, again. Kobane was a great success in the reconquista that followed ISIS’ earlier pushes in Northern Syria. It seems that it has been just taken back by the armies of the Caliphate.

ISIS is also elsewhere, and it seems that it suffered a defeat in Libya in the last weeks. Foreign Policy reports on the battle in Derna, where ISIS was expelled by a (very) heterogeneous coalition including DMSC (Mujahideen Shura Council, linked to al-Qaeda) and the Libyan National Army.

In the meanwhile, in Europe, tensions are building up on the Eastern border. The US has been strengthening its NATO allies with increasing military support, by support meaning weapons. The last shipment involved about 250 tanks under a new plan devised by the Pentagon (or for) with allies.

Tensions in the real world, tensions in the virtual one. China is allegedly behind hacking the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in the US, with a wealth of data on government employees. But attribution, when it comes to China, becomes a delicate diplomatic issue and no final culprit is yet revealed.

Finally, we keep suggesting military vehicles that you might be desire to get to solve traffic problems, loading requirements, and so on. This comes directly from Star Wars.

 

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 57

ISIS always makes headlines. And it still seems to surprise several observers, some of whom foresee its rapid demise every week it does not make important territorial gains. Well, ISIS recently reached the historical city of Palmyra, in Syria, worrying strategists and archeologists alike. The human cost of war in the area is staggering as well.

And ISIS did not stop there, but is trying to cause havoc in the Kingdom (of Saudi Arabia) as well. A recent mosque attack might signal more to come, also due to the radicalization of (a part of) Saudi youth.

So, why are teenagers joining ISIS? The New Yorkers’ Ben Taub tries to provide some answers.

Not many good news for US policy-makers, then. The good ones seem recently to come often from technological advances. Even manpower-intense activities such as Special Operations should greatly benefit, for instance, from increased speed of DNA reader in conducting terrorists’ searches.

Obituary: John Nash died in a car accident on Sunday. He reached popular fame after the movie A Beautiful Mind portrayed both his genius and his mental illnesses. He was, among other things, one of the fathers of game theory, one of the branches of mathematics that affected the most strategic theory, especially during the Cold War. His legacy is rich, and often non-penetrable to laymen. But RAND Corporation, where Nash was a consultant for several years in that period, still maintains a section on game theory and its several applications for social sciences and policy.

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