Call for Papers & Panels – 2nd Annual Conference of the European Initiative on Security Studies (EISS)

We are pleased to highlight the 2nd annual conference of the European Initiative on Security Studies (EISS). The conference will be held in Paris on 21-22 June 2018 at the University Panthéon-Assas (Paris 2).

The EISS is a Europe-wide network of over sixty universities that share the goal of consolidating security studies in Europe. Here you’ll find all the info on the EISS.

Here the call for papers and panels with a description of: the objectives of the EISS, key information on the conference (including on the difference between ‘closed’ and ‘open’ panels), the draft program and the panels’ abstracts.

The EISS conference is organized by the Association for the Study of War and Strategy (AEGES) in collaboration with the Center Thucydides and the Center for Studies and Research on Administrative and Political Science (CERSA) of the University Panthéon-Assas (Paris 2).

 Here you’ll find all the details on the conference.

 The deadlines for submitting paper proposals for closed panels and panel proposals for open panels are as follows:

31 January 2018: deadline for sending paper proposals to the panel chairs and panel proposals to the EISS. NB Paper proposals should be sent to the panel chairs (cf. their emails in the attached document) while panel proposals should be sent to the EISS  (eissnetwork@gmail.com)

Mid-late February 2018: decision on open panels by EISS; and on papers for closed panels by chairs

March 2018: final program sent to participants

The report of last year’s conference (EISS 2017) is available here

 See you in Paris…

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Top5 by Venus in Arms – Week 73

First Democratic Party primary debate last night. How did candidates perform on foreign policy? Fred Kaplan argues that is was a clear win for Hillary Clinton.

Whoever becomes President, however, will face many challenges and several unsolved issues. Even in countries that have been traditionally stable. Turkey is one of these cases, as the dramatic bombing occurred a few days ago showed several cracks.

And American strategy, Adam Elkus argues on Warontherocks.com, is in a very bad state. Who killed it? In a CSI-like reconstruction, Elkus makes an accusation to the community of strategists: “the shocking plot twist in tonight’s episode of CSI: Pentagon is that we — the community of people that talk, debate, write about, and work in the making of strategy — were nonetheless accessories to the crime. How? We failed at the most critical task of all — understanding the nature of the problem and proposing solutions””. To keep in mind, for a blog/website on strategy.

We don’t know if academic research is faring much better. Jarrod Hayes discusses the state of the most ambitious objective of social sciences, prediction.

On a more practical note, but always looking at the future, future robots will be able to predict the moves of humans confronting them. This  breakthrough – somewhat disturbing for those passionate about Asimov’s I, Robot – is due to improvements in the “brain” (the algorithms of the software) of the machines.

 

 

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