Our book…

We are pleased to announce that we’ve just received the first copies of our book: “The Transformation of Italian Armed Forces in Comparative Perspective. Adapt, Improvise, Overcome?“, F. Coticchia and F.N. Moro, Ashgate, 2015.

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Here you’ll find the full contents list.

Here the first reviews.

We consider the manuscript as the ViA’s book. The blog will provide you further details on our research on military transformation in Europe. First of all, here you can download the introduction.

Let us know what do you think about…

 

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – week 60 (Bisa in London)

This week the Top-5 is BISA-centred. We have already presented our paper at the Annual Convention in London.

Our first suggestion is to look at the updated programme of the Conference. We’ve been part of a lively panel of coalition politics and foreign policy.

We’ve been also at a panel on military transformation in Europe. Quite interesting. On this issue we remind the forthcoming contribution by ViA.

This year the conference theme is  inequality. “The landscape of global security studies remains dominated by questions about inequalities of power and the uses to which those inequalities are put”.  The workshop on inequality at the BISA  is scheduled on Thursday afternoon. It seems promising.

On the UK and its future in the EU, we suggest this interview to the European Parliament President, Martin Schultz. “David Cameron’s campaign to ditch the EU’s mission as one of ‘ever closer union’ has no chance of success, said the president of the European parliament”

Moving from conference to conference check the forthcoming Italian Standing Group on International Relations. Via will be there with 2 papers. See you in Trento.

 

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“Our” book: The Transformation of Italian Armed Forces in Comparative Perspective

The editors of Venus in Arms are pleased to present their most recent book: “The Transformation of Italian Armed Forces in Comparative Perspective. Adapt, Improvise, Overcome“. Ashgate (Series: Military Strategy and Operational Art) has  just released online the detailed description of the book, which will be published in July 2015.

The book is about the change in Italian Armed Forces since 2001. The manuscript focuses on new empirical evidence on how the Italian forces, compared and contrasted with the French and the British ones, have devised their doctrines, their force structures and their budgets.

Here below an overall introduction to the research:

European armed forces have undergone deep changes in the past two decades. Given the breadth of the debate and the size of transformations that took place, it is somewhat surprising that relatively few academic studies have directly dealt with changes in force structure of European militaries, and the Italian armed forces in particular. The focus of this book is the organizational dimension of the restructuring of armed forces through 3 different lenses: doctrine and strategic framework, budget and resource allocation, and force structure and deployment. The key issues addressed relate to how these factors interact in shaping transformation. Of particular interest is the theme of learning, which is how armed forces endogenize change in the short and long run. This study provides valuable insights into the extent to which armed forces manage to adapt to the emerging strategic and operational challenges they have to face and to illustrate the weight of institutional legacies, resources constraints, and inter-organizational learning in shaping transformation. Focusing on the Italian case in comparative perspective and based on a large variety of military operations from airstrikes to peacekeeping and counterinsurgency, the book provides an innovative viewpoint on military transformation and significantly contributes to our understanding of contemporary security that is deeply shaped by the lessons learnt in Afghanistan, Lebanon, Iraq and Libya.

We will provide additional details and previews of main findings in next weeks.

P.S. Yes, “Adapt, Improvise, Overcome” refers to the Marine Corps’ mantra popularized by Sergeant Gunny (Clint Eastwood)

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Top 5 by Venus in Arms – Week 30

This week Venus in Arms will be in London to participate at the next ASMI conference (Association for the Study of Modern Italy) and for other stuff (see, among others: Stamford Bridge). So, this Top 5 focuses exclusively on the UK (in terms of sources of news, issues, etc.).

The British “The Guardian” provides an excellent report on the “Islamic State’s Oil Empire”. A very useful analysis on refineriesand smuggling for better understanding the current context in Syria and Iraq.

The Department of War Studies at the King’s College will host a conference on “NATO ISAF Civil-Military Relations“. The event is organized by the Afghanistan Studies Group, whose website if full of articles and analyses on Afghanistan.

Moving from Afghanistan to Iraq: here you’ll find a detailed account of the UK involvement in the air strikes against ISIL.

In the meanwhile, British troops (on exercise in Poland) have been ordered not to take mobile phones or computers amid fears they will be targeted by Russian cyber spies. Here you’ll find more info on the controversial case.

Finally, have a look again at the Tower of London Poppies. Each of the 888.246 poppies represents a Commonwealth soldier who died during the WWI. Some troubles occurred for their removal.

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